CCa’s System 1032 Scores High Marks

Since 1887, Pomona College in Claremont, California, has offered degrees in humanities, fine arts, social and natural sciences to its carefully selected population of approximately 1,400 students. Like all colleges and universities, Pomona’s critical challenge is controlling costs to sustain efficient operations while managing large amounts of information to track and support its student body.

Pomona has developed an IT solution that addresses budgetary issues and provides superior access and management to its operation-critical business and student information. At the heart of this solution resides System 1032, the DEC-based database management software from Computer Corporation of America.

In 1980, Pomona began working with CCA’s DBMS System 1022. When System 1022 advanced to System 1032, Jack Quinlan, Director of Administrative Computing, took this opportunity to work with his staff of three programmers to define Pomona’s idea of the perfect system. Quinlan, now a 16-year veteran of Pomona’s IT department, led his team through a DBMS review process that considered a wide variety of implementations and user scenarios. The team wanted to create a system that could service the college’s current IT requirements and continue to be effective and efficient well into the future.

“We wanted to be sure that System 1032 was stable and robust enough to fit our growing needs before we made any changes,” said Quinlan. “We provide critical information to all aspects of the college – in this environment, delays, mistakes and inflexibility are not acceptable.”

Pomona College converted to System 1032 during the 1991-1992 school year. Pomona has continued its investment in CCA’s DEC-based system because the database engine addresses the college’s primary need: fast, easy-to-use, cost-effective information management.

The System 1032 application development environment is designed to support the OpenVMS user community with high-performance, flexible and easy-to-manage database technology. Quinlan and his team developed Pomona’s System 1032 applications from concept through execution, creating a menu-driven system written in PL1032 code. Their planning and foresight enabled them to create a system that grows and advances in stride with the college’s demands and apace with technology’s advancements.

“We particularly value the ability 1032 gives us to quickly adapt to the changing needs of our administrative customers by adding and modifying customized applications,” said Quinlan.

The application tracks all aspects of student data from initial interviews and enrollment through registration and the accumulation of academic records, up to and beyond graduation. Pomona’s 1032 application has approximately 400 datasets and 1,200 procedures; it is completely integrated across the entire college and supports up to 100 concurrent administrative users at any one time. The records can be accessed by 35 different college units, offices, or office subsets. System 1032 offers all the functionality required to address Pomona’s current IT needs and is capable of accommodating significant growth.

System 1032 is traditionally known for its capabilities with extremely large datasets. While this is true, Pomona cites the system’s ease-of-use and speed as its most valuable characteristics. All three – capacity, ease-of-use and speed – can be attributed to the system’s flawless integration with the DEC Alpha and VAX platforms.

“We can bring novice computer users into any office at Pomona College and on their first or second day they can run our System 1032 on their own. They can read the functionality from its menus and select the item they want to run,” said Quinlan. “It’s that easy.”

Another advantage to Pomona’s implementation of System 1032 are libraries of recurring procedures. Some are independent procedures that are accessible to all the system’s users; others are designed to allow code to be reused without requiring the programming staff to rewrite its functionality.

“It saves us a lot of time when we create new applications,” said Quinlan. “All the code is tested and already in use, so we are confident that it will work and be compatible with existing programs.”

In addition to System 1032’s ease-of-use, Pomona users are very satisfied with its rapid processing. “Studies have shown that if users have to wait more than a few seconds for a response from a system, they get irritated,” stated Quinlan. “System 1032 usually responds almost instantaneously, which keeps our users satisfied and productive. Although we know there is one, we can’t place a quantitative dollar value on a satisfied customer.

“With CCA and System 1032, we’ve found a system that really works for us,” continued Quinlan. “We are integrated across the school and System 1032 can do anything we want it to do.

OverView

Computer Corporation of America (CCA), based in Framingham, Massachusetts, is a leading designer, developer, and marketer of high-performance, high-capacity database management software. CCA’s database technology provides unparalleled performance to maximize business potential. Focused primarily on the resurgent IBM mainframe market, the company’s innovative database technology provides its growing roster of worldwide customers with high-speed data access and extensive data management solutions. The company is employee owned, with offices throughout North America and in Europe. Over 1,000 commercial and government organizations worldwide benefit from CCA technology.
Company Mission

CCA’s mission continues to reflect its long-standing commitment to its customers: to develop and maintain partner-based relationships with its customers by supporting high-performance, open access to critical business information, leveraging their investments in information technology. CCA devotes its business entirely to its core competencies: designing and building large-scale high-performance, high-capacity database management products that support interactive end-user access from terminals, desktop computers, and the World Wide Web.

History of CCA

Founded in 1965, CCA has over 30 years of experience as an internationally recognized leader in the design and manufacture of high-speed database management systems. CCA has traditionally concentrated on high-capacity database technology for IBM mainframe systems. In 1992, CCA broadened its product and service offerings with the acquisition of database technology based on Digital Equipment Corporation’s computers, and large-scale investment in new technologies. CCA is the prominent provider of high-performance, high-capacity database technology in the worldwide market.

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Centrelink employs

Centrelink is an Australian government services organization headquartered in Canberra. Centrelink is responsible for the social security entitlements of approximately seven million people in Australia at any given time.

Centrelink employs more than 20,000 staff in over 320 locations across Australia and is structured around three organizational components: a National Administration located in Canberra; 16 area offices; and an Australia-wide network of over 290 full-time service delivery units in the form of Regional Offices, Centrelink Offices, District Offices, and TeleService Centers. The agency also interfaces with other government organizations, agencies, financial and other institutions, and community organizations. The scope and scale of the agency’s services are tremendous. Centrelink annually provides approximately $40 billion in benefits for the retired, unemployed, students, the sick, and families on low incomes.

Managing this vast amount of financial and personnel data is an enormous task. Since 1983, Centrelink has been using CCA’s Model 204 high-performance database technology to do just that. Centrelink chose Model 204 after an exhaustive search for a high-performance, high-capacity database management system that was also extremely flexible.

Due to the involved nature of government services, Centrelink’s data management requirements were quite complex. The first consideration was the sheer capacity of the system. Centrelink also needed the ability to easily modify applications and data housed in the system. Another requirement was the need for information in real-time. And because Centrelink’s offices were spread across an entire continent, the organization required decentralized processing of centrally controlled data.

The Model 204 system, implemented enterprise-wide, has met Centrelink’s complex requirements and provided integrated information management capabilities throughout the entire organization, across an entire continent.

At the heart of Centrelink’s IT infrastructure is a cluster of five IBM mainframes located in Canberra and Sydney. Four mainframes are used for production and one for development and testing. These clusters consist of 45 processors with 18 gigabytes of memory. The mainframes are connected to over 3.5 terabytes of disk storage. Model 204 processes more than nine million transactions each day from Centrelink regional offices. On average, approximately 12,000 users at Centrelink are logged on to the mainframes simultaneously and the total peak throughput rate is at 320 transactions per second.

Through its use of Model 204, Centrelink has been able to significantly improve its IT efficiency and reduce expenditures for IT, staffing, and associated program costs. In evidence of this, Fujitsu Consulting conducted a three-month study of the value of Centrelink’s IT investment versus the actual costs spent over the last 13 years.

“The results of the study indicated that a total of $2 billion was spent realizing $6.5 billion in cost savings through improved efficiencies at Centrelink,” notes Charlie Rutten, Assistant Secretary at Centrelink’s Applications Services Division. “We certainly couldn’t have achieved these results without Model 204. If our original processes had been in place, the current staffing of 24,000 would escalate to over 61,000, alternatively our program costs would have increased by $28 billion.”

Model 204 will play a significant role in the future growth of the agency. Centrelink has recently expanded and is now responsible for operations and support for the functions of the Department of Employment, Education, Training, and Youth Affairs (DEETYA), including the Office of Student Assistance and Job Placement for the Unemployed. This expansion has resulted in the addition of 4,000 more staff.

The real benefit provided by CCA’s technology lies in the empowerment of Centrelink’s benefit recipients. In the coming millennium, individuals served by the agency will take on greater responsibility for meeting their own needs in terms of job placement, training, unemployment, sickness, and retirement benefits. These individuals will now play a critical role in the dynamics of the service provided, and their involvement, along with CCA’s data management capabilities, will be an integral part of Centrelink’s continued success.

Harris Methodist Health System

Harris Methodist Health System is a major medical facilities network, headquartered in Arlington, Texas. The network consists of eight hospitals and a health maintenance organization. The hospitals’ and HMO’s computer systems are completely integrated and support more than 750 concurrent users daily. Thousands of doctors access the systems to obtain information on surgery schedules, test results, test requests, and other pertinent patient information.

Administrators from both the hospitals and the HMO use the systems to access patient administration, financial, and clinical information. Harris Methodist manages all of this data, over 500 gigabytes, using CCA’s Model 204 database management system.

Harris Methodist has been a customer of CCA since 1984, when it was a single hospital facility. Since that time, the organization has grown tremendously to become a major health network serving the Dallas Fort Worth area. As with any major health care facility, Harris Methodist has struggled with the problems of spiraling health care costs. A major component of the problem is the cost of managing the paperwork involved in such operations as billing, delivering test results, and filing insurance forms. In many health care organizations, the approach to information processing is to develop systems for each department – one for the laboratory, another for the nursing stations, and still another for accounting. As a result, they are often left with islands of information with no bridges between them.

Harris Methodist recognized the need to integrate these islands to quickly deliver test results from the lab to the doctor; to automate accounting services and reduce paper flows; to guard against the prescription of drugs that may produce harmful interactions with previous prescriptions; in short to maximize the efficiency of information flows and the value received from them. In 1986, in an effort to streamline its operations processes, reduce costs, and provide better patient care, the hospital embarked on the implementation of a fully integrated hospital administration system. CCA’s Model 204 is at the core of that integrated system. The hospital chose Model 204 after an exhaustive search for a high performance, high capacity database management system that was also extremely flexible.

Harris Methodist was facing many challenges. The organization was growing at a rapid rate and the DBMS of choice would have to accommodate significant changes. The hospital wanted the ability to easily modify applications and data housed in the system. Another consideration was the need for information in real-time. Seconds can make a significant difference in the treatment of critically ill patients. Doctors want test results in hours, not days. And while there was a need to share data, much of that data was confidential, requiring decentralized processing, but centralized control.

CCA and Model 204 provided Harris Methodist with an open, flexible information management solution that has enabled the organization to decentralize information while centralizing its control – an important factor considering Harris Methodist has over 3,000 applications, all of which are totally integrated.

Model 204 manages all administrative and financial applications; the patient information systems; all clinical systems including pharmacy, laboratory, radiology, and respiratory therapy; and accounting information including accounts payable, accounts receivable, billing, and collections. The system stores over 450 million records and processes over 20 million transactions a month, with an average response time of .6 seconds per transaction. CCA’s technology has enabled Harris Methodist to keep its costs down and its transaction processing performance high, all while managing a growing, profitable health organization.

The hospital continues to grow. Sometime ago, Harris Methodist merged with another hospital in the Dallas area, the St. Paul Medical Center. The transition of systems, including the process of extracting data and loading historical information into Model 204, went smoothly.

Best of all, Harris Methodist’s patients benefit as well. Test results are available much faster, and the savings derived from a less labor-intensive process are passed on to the patients and their insurers. By carefully realigning systems to mirror their health care needs and corporate strategies, Harris Methodist has aggressively streamlined the movement of data to enable high quality, cost effective health care

Directions to CCA Corporate Headquarters

From Logan Airport:
Follow the signs towards Boston (Route 1A). As you approach the toll plaza, change to the right-hand lane. After paying the toll, stay in the right lane of the two lanes leading into the Sumner Tunnel. After exiting the tunnel, follow the signs to Route 93 South. On Route 93 South, after passing the South Station exit, you enter a tunnel. Just after emerging from the tunnel, take the exit for Route 90 (Mass Pike).

From Massachusetts Turnpike:
Take Exit 13 off the Mass Pike. After the toll booth, bear to the right onto Route 30 West, Framingham. At the first lights, take a right onto Burr Street. Follow Burr Street to the end
(.4 mile). Take a left onto Speen Street, and follow to the end (.1 mile), bearing right at the fork, right before the lights, onto Old Connecticut Path. Go up .2 mile, where the entrance to 500 Carousel Office Park is on the left just beyond the Shell Gas Station. CCA is in the third office building on the second floor.

From Route 9:
Take Route 9 (West from Boston or East from Worcester) to Speen Street. Get on Speen Street going towards the Mass Pike. Go 1.2 miles to the end of Speen Street (you cross over Route 30, Exxon Station on the right). Take a right at the fork, right before the lights, onto Old Connecticut Path. Go up .2 mile, where the entrance to 500 Carousel Office Park is on the left just beyond the Shell Gas Station. CCA is in the third office building on the second floor.

From Dulles International Airport:

Exit the Dulles Access Road at Route 7 East (Leesburg Pike) toward Tysons Corner and follow to 3rd stop light (Westpark Drive). make a left turn at the light and then a right at the next light onto Greensboro Drive. The Education Center is the last driveway on the left, just before the intersection with International drive. After taking a left into the driveway, bear to the right and enter the parking garage (8180) to visitor parking. Follow the directions form visitor parking listed below.

From Washington DC or Washington National Airport:

Take I-66 West to I-495 North to Exit 11B, Route 123 South toward Tysons Corner (Chain Bridge Road). At the intersection with International Drive (2nd stop light), turn right and proceed to Greensboro Drive (1st stop light). Turn left at the light and take the first parking. Follow the directions from visitor parking listed below.

From I-95 South (from Springfield and points South):

Take Exit 170B to I-495 North (Rockville). At approximately 6-8 miles, take Exit 11B, Route 123 South toward Tysons Corner (chain Bridge Road). Follow the directions for Washington, DC (from the intersection of International Drive).

From I-95 North (from Baltimore):

Exit I-495 West toward Silver Spring. Stay on I-495 into Virginia. (The America Legion Bridge separates Maryland and Virginia.) Just after signs to Dulles International Airport, take Exit 11B, Route South toward Tysons Corner and follow the directions for Washington, DC (from the intersection of International Drive).

From I-270:

Take the I-495 Northern Virginia exit. Follow previously listed directions forma The American Legion Bridge.

From the Visitor Parking to the Education Center:

The Visitor parking area is located under Building 8180 on the first level. DO NOT PARK IN THE RESERVED PARKING SPACES IN THE OUTDOOR LOT. YOU WILL BE TOWED. Follow signs to the stairway and go down one level to “Level 2” where the tunnel is located. Go through the tunnel, which ends in the garage under Building 8200. Look for the entrance with the G1 sign which takes you to the elevators in Building 8200. The Education Center is located on the 11th floor, suite 1150.

From Logan Airport:
Follow the signs towards Boston (Route 1A). As you approach the toll plaza, change to the right-hand lane. After paying the toll, stay in the right lane of the two lanes leading into the Sumner Tunnel. After exiting the tunnel, follow the signs to Route 93 South. On Route 93 South, after passing the South Station exit, you enter a tunnel. Just after emerging from the tunnel, take the exit for Route 90 (Mass Pike).

From Massachusetts Turnpike:
Take Exit 13 off the Mass Pike. After the toll booth, bear to the right onto Route 30 West, Framingham. At the first lights, take a right onto Burr Street. Follow Burr Street to the end
(.4 mile). Take a left onto Speen Street, and follow to the end (.1 mile), bearing right at the fork, right before the lights, onto Old Connecticut Path. Go up .2 mile, where the entrance to 500 Carousel Office Park is on the left just beyond the Shell Gas Station. CCA is in the third office building on the second floor.

From Route 9:
Take Route 9 (West from Boston or East from Worcester) to Speen Street. Get on Speen Street going towards the Mass Pike. Go 1.2 miles to the end of Speen Street (you cross over Route 30, Exxon Station on the right). Take a right at the fork, right before the lights, onto Old Connecticut Path. Go up .2 mile, where the entrance to 500 Carousel Office Park is on the left just beyond the Shell Gas Station. CCA is in the third office building on the second floor.

From Dulles International Airport:

Exit the Dulles Access Road at Route 7 East (Leesburg Pike) toward Tysons Corner and follow to 3rd stop light (Westpark Drive). make a left turn at the light and then a right at the next light onto Greensboro Drive. The Education Center is the last driveway on the left, just before the intersection with International drive. After taking a left into the driveway, bear to the right and enter the parking garage (8180) to visitor parking. Follow the directions form visitor parking listed below.

From Washington DC or Washington National Airport:

Take I-66 West to I-495 North to Exit 11B, Route 123 South toward Tysons Corner (Chain Bridge Road). At the intersection with International Drive (2nd stop light), turn right and proceed to Greensboro Drive (1st stop light). Turn left at the light and take the first parking. Follow the directions from visitor parking listed below.

From I-95 South (from Springfield and points South):

Take Exit 170B to I-495 North (Rockville). At approximately 6-8 miles, take Exit 11B, Route 123 South toward Tysons Corner (chain Bridge Road). Follow the directions for Washington, DC (from the intersection of International Drive).

From I-95 North (from Baltimore):

Exit I-495 West toward Silver Spring. Stay on I-495 into Virginia. (The America Legion Bridge separates Maryland and Virginia.) Just after signs to Dulles International Airport, take Exit 11B, Route South toward Tysons Corner and follow the directions for Washington, DC (from the intersection of International Drive).

Take the I-495 Northern Virginia exit. Follow previously listed directions forma The American Legion Bridge.

From the Visitor Parking to the Education Center:

The Visitor parking area is located under Building 8180 on the first level. DO NOT PARK IN THE RESERVED PARKING SPACES IN THE OUTDOOR LOT. YOU WILL BE TOWED. Follow signs to the stairway and go down one level to “Level 2” where the tunnel is located. Go through the tunnel, which ends in the garage under Building 8200. Look for the entrance with the G1 sign which takes you to the elevators in Building 8200. The Education Center is located on the 11th floor, suite 1150.

From the North:
Come South on the M6, M1, or A1, turn onto the M25. Leave the M25 onto the M4 heading towards Wales. Leave the M4 at Junction 7, follow the A4 towards Maidenhead. After crossing the River Thames, continue on the A4 to the third roundabout, turn left into Market Street. CCA is immediately on your left.

From the South:
Come North on the M25, join the M4 heading West. Leave the M4 at Junction 7, follow the A4 towards Maidenhead. After crossing the River Thames, continue on the A4 to the third roundabout, turn left into Market Street. CCA is immediately on your left.

From London:
Leave London on the M4. Leave the M4 at Junction 7, follow the A4 towards Maidenhead. After crossing the River Thames, continue on the A4 to the third roundabout, turn left into Market Street. CCA is immediately on your left.

From Maidenhead Railway Station:
Walk out of the station and cross over the pedestrian crossing ahead, turn right into Queen Street, passing the Bell Pub on the right. Walk straight ahead, over the road until you meet with the High Street with Marks and Spencer on you left. Turn diagonally right into Market Street and walk straight on to the end of the street to find CCA on your right adjacent to the corner of the roundabout. (There is a

The Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation

The Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation (TDMHMR), headquartered in Austin, Texas, is a state agency that runs over 20 inpatient facilities for the mentally ill and the mentally retarded. TDMHMR also has contractual arrangements with over 50 outpatient programs state-wide, directly overseeing 10 such programs.

All of the agency’s mental health professionals and administrators access vital patient continuity-of-care records, Medicaid reimbursement, and high-level diagnostic information which is stored and tracked on TDMHMR’s computer systems. The systems also store employee and personnel information including salary and vacation time. These systems are completely integrated and support more than 250 concurrent users daily. Model 204, a high performance, high capacity database management system from Computer Corporation of America (CCA) is the heart and soul of these complex systems.

Historically, the majority of Texas’ mental health clients were cared for as full-time patients at hospital facilities across the state. During the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s, mental healthcare institutions in the United States began a process known as “de-institutionalization,” which shifted the vast majority of clients from inpatient to outpatient care. The shift was designed to reduce the high cost of inpatient care while maintaining the best supervision possible for clients on an outpatient basis.

TDMHMR needed to develop a system to store and track all the information required to serve both inpatient and outpatient clients across the state. Tracking and recording accurate histories of mentally ill and retarded clients proved to be a particularly daunting task. The clients often moved without notifying anyone, and many provided false information which resulted in incorrect histories and duplicate client records. As client numbers grew and the complexity of information required to provide care increased, TDMHMR needed a new high performance, high capacity database management system that could manage the vast amounts of client and administrative information. They also required flexible indexing and search parameters so that duplicate records could be identified, even if they weren’t identical matches. TDMHMR found all those capabilities in Model 204.

The agency chose Model 204 after an extensive evaluation of five other database management systems. CCA and Model 204 provide TDMHMR with an open, flexible information management solution that has enabled the organization to successfully track thousands of clients.

“We need a database system that provides both the flexibility and performance to accommodate constant changes to client records,” states Julie Bonner, senior programmer for TDMHMR. “Model 204 data structures are easily changed and many database attributes can be modified in-flight which makes it easy to update and change systems and applications without having to reconfigure the entire database. In addition, the native User Language supplied with Model 204 has increased programmer productivity multifold over the old 3GL language we used to use. Using Model 204, tasks that used to take months are now completed in weeks, days and sometimes even hours.”

Model 204 maintains a high level tracking system with sufficient data to report on work loads and manage contracts across the agency’s many operations. Model 204 also manages all state personnel, inpatient and client information systems. In total, the system tracks approximately 1 million patient records and stores over 30 million total records, with an average response time of less than 1 second per transaction. It also uploads 25 million Medicaid eligibility records weekly. Model 204 simplifies administrative processes and provides TDMHMR with the capability to keep costs down and service standards high.

“Model 204 gave us technology in the early 1980s that, even today, continues to increase our productivity and keeps costs to a minimum,” continues Bonner. “Model 204 was one of the first database technologies to have inverted list indexing technology and record-level locking – there are more ways into Model 204 than any other database out there. I don’t think our organization could have survived with as small an IS department without Model 204.”

Due to Model 204’s success and Year 2000 capabilities already in place within the organization, TDMHMR plans to take over the long-term care program for the Texas Department of Human Resources for mentally retarded patients. CCA’s technology will continue to support TDMHMR in its efforts to keep costs down and its patient care standards high, all while managing a complex yet efficient statewide healthcare organization.

West Chester University

West Chester University (WCU), a public institution of approximately 9,400 undergraduate and 2,000 graduate students outside Philadelphia, is the second largest of 14 institutions in Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education. West Chester offers its diverse student body degrees in the arts and sciences, teacher training and certification, advanced study preparation in fields such as medicine and law, education for specific professions, and continuing education.

To run the institution smoothly, WCU administrators demand that the records for its student body, alumni and administrative functions be maintained in an efficient and cost-effective manner. These records are kept on a database which is at the heart of the University’s operations. 15 gigabytes of information are stored and accessed by the registrar, admissions, human resources, finance, and other administrative offices. This type of integrated data access proves invaluable to WCU’s administrators, but maintenance of this type of system can be very costly.

State-funded universities, like all small businesses, keep a close eye on the bottom line and are always looking for opportunities to trim costs and increase efficiency.

The real cost of any system rests in the resources needed to develop, maintain, update, and guarantee consistent services. Tom Egan is the executive director of West Chester’s Business Technology Center. “The human factor in all of this can be immense. Time and errors are big resource-sinks,” says Egan. “We are constantly aware of this and make sure that every effort is made to keep costs down and effectiveness high.”

In 1985, WCU’s existing mainframe system no longer met its needs. Egan led the University’s push to invest in a database that was guaranteed to keep administrative costs low and meet the school’s evolving demands over time. WCU knew that replacing a database system was a long-term, cost-based, functionality-focused investment. The University conducted a very competitive nine month bid process which screened all commercial products available. The panel was surprised to find that the common path of third-party, turn-key systems was not the most cost-effective option. In fact, WCU discovered that investing in a pre-designed package would be at least three times more expensive than generating its own system.

WCU turned to Computer Corporation of America (CCA) for help. CCA is a worldwide provider of high-performance, high-capacity database management systems. Known for its dedication to developing and maintaining long standing relationships with its customers, CCA worked with WCU to provide an integrated, cost-effective solution that supported open access to WCU’s critical business information and leveraged its investment in information technology.

WCU programmers designed a system using CCA’s Model 204 high-performance database technology. This system addressed the school’s constant growth of records, supported the increase of casual users, and promised to keep pace with modern technology. Most importantly, Model 204 was capable of addressing these and other issues cost-effectively.

WCU’s small administrative computing staff was able to port all data to the new system within three months. Model 204 had all the functionality of the legacy system, plus additional capabilities including a fourth-generation language, open connectivity into the database, and a highly accelerated capability to build new applications. Within one year, Model 204 was out-performing the old system in every aspect.

The next year, in a periodic product review, CCA technicians told WCU programmers that compared to other Model 204 scenarios, WCU’s system had a tremendous amount of unrealized potential. WCU, with CCA’s help, reconfigured the system for maximum performance in six months. Together they created an administrative database solution that, in less than two years, provided the school with data solutions far above their original requirements.

“With Model 204, we were fully operational in one year, and done with our original scope of development in two,” Egan states. “That kind of turn-around keeps businesses moving forward. Finances were tight when we initially chose the system, and they continue to be. We made a tough, unorthodox decision-all eyes were on us-and we made the right choice.

“Resources are limited in any educational institution. You have to have faith in your provider when you invest in one inclusive system from start-up through 100% imple- mentation,” continues Egan. “The cost of ownership of Model 204 combined with the savings of staff salaries and minimized human-errors reveal some serious savings. At the time we could not find another database anywhere that was more cost-effective and more performance-based than Model 204. This statement is stilltrue today!”

Over 12 years later, Model 204 continues to outperform all expectations. Currently, WCU has over 2,000 student and administrator PCs fully meshed with the network service, and approximately 200 database users at any one time. But, as Egan comments, “The numbers of users was never an issue-Model 204 handled anything we asked of it. It was the cost-effectiveness that sold us initially and is what continues to keep us very loyal to Model 204 and to CCA.”

As technology develops over time, Model 204 continues to keep WCU up to speed with capabilities like database access through the Web. The school’s student records are now available on-line, allowing students, professors and other university employees access to scheduling information through their Web browser. The self-scheduling program is available to all 9,400 underclassmen, and includes major-only verification, two-way commu-nication between students and advisors, and a degree audit system that allows advisors to assist students with planning their schedules.

In addition to self-scheduling, prospective students can query course offerings as well as off-campus housing availability, both of which provide real-time response information. “It’s a dynamic resource,” says Cindy Barnes, WCU’s manager of appli-cation development. “Model 204 allows us to exploit modern interfaces without impacting our legacy systems. For businesses with superior performance needs and modest budgets like WCU, Model 204 is an excellent solution. Model 204’s power, flexibility, and openness allow us to meet the needs of our institution in a rapidly changing environment.”

Roadway’s LTL

Headquartered in Akron, Ohio, Roadway Express, Inc. is one of the nation’s leading motor freight carriers specializing in LTL (less-than-truckload) shipments.

Roadway’s LTL approach provides companies with an inexpensive, efficient means of shipping loads that do not require an entire trailer. Roadway Express operates more than 400 facilities in North America and employs over 25,000 people.With its fleet of 40,000 trucks, trailers and tractors, Roadway handles nearly 14 million shipments a year throughout North America, Puerto Rico and Japan, with export services to over 65 countries worldwide.

Roadway handles nearly 60,000 shipments a day. Many of these deliveries contain multiple pieces of freight that move through more than one field location. In addition to tracking the pickup, delivery, and intermediate handling of each shipment, employees in each of Roadway’s field offices are responsible for entering detailed information about each shipment such as shipper, consignee, address, product description, pieces and weight. All of this results in an enormous amount of information to be managed.

The system that stores and tracks all of Roadway’s critical business information is QUIKTRAK® the company’s cutting edge, integrated system for instantaneous freight tracking. At the heart of QUIKTRAK is CCA’s Model 204 DBMS. Model 204 stores all of Roadway’s mission critical freight operations data including customer, dispatch, freight shipment, billing, shipment tracking, invoicing and computerized rate information.

Model 204 was implemented at Roadway in 1988 when it became apparent that the inaccessibility of real-time data made it difficult for Roadway’s field managers to make timely decisions on staffing, drivers, truck availability, shipment routing and related costs. With the implementation of the QUIKTRAK system, Roadway became the first company in the trucking industry to provide instant access to shipment and rate information to its employees and customers, allowing quick response to customers for inbound planning, best-possible routing scenarios and the most cost-effective shipping plans.

Roadway’s entire business relies on the reliability, availability and real-time responsiveness of Model 204. Over 2,500 concurrent users access the system, which tracks more than 9 million shipments, houses over 500,000 customer records, and processes over 2 million transactions a day. All of this is achieved with 99.5% availability of system.

With the capabilities provided by Model 204, Roadway’s field managers can now make decisions quickly and effectively. The system handles a very high volume of transactions within a very short processing time and has given Roadway the ability to link together a number of databases. Customer satisfaction has also improved now that customers, as well as managers and shipment staff, have real-time knowledge about shipment location and movement.

According to Pam Kelley, Director of IT with Roadway Express, “Model 204 gives us the performance and flexibility we need to manage all of this data with speed and reliability. We chose CCA’s Model 204 because it is hands down the best performing database management system on the market – we couldn’t run our business without it. It’s also extremely cost effective. The software’s flexible design and high capacity capabilities continue to save Roadway considerable CPUs, and that’s enabled us to delay a capital expenditure on a new mainframe system.”

Model 204’s high performance, high capacity capabilities have made Roadway’s shipment management and tracking system a business application worthy of note. The system was selected as the premier database application at the 1996 Very Large Database Summit and, for the 12th year, Roadway Express was selected by Distribution Magazine as a winner of its “Quest for Quality” award. In short, CCA and Model 204 have proven they can deliver for Roadway Express.